- THE REINTEGRATION OF ABANDONED STRUCTURES INTO REGIONS THROUGH A NETWORK OF SMALL TOWNS: THE EXAMPLE OF FORTRESS GOLUBAC ON THE DANUBE    click here to open paper contentno file
by    Djokic, Jasmina | jasmina_djokic@yahoo.com   click here to send an email to the auther(s) of this paper
Short Outline
The graduate course in Urban Planning, Design and Management involved researching the existing and potential role of abandoned towns in the wider spatial context.
As a participant in this research, I examined the possibilities for their (re)integration into wider spatial and functional wholes. Abandoned towns can be linked one to another at spatial levels of varying scope, but also according to different criteria: cultural, historical, bio-geographical, etc. In other words, there are at least two ways of linking: (1) connecting these artifacts into a complex functional network, and (2) their integration into existing regional wholes.
The latter way is especially interesting because there is a two-way influence: cultural and historical, environmental, tourist, and other potentials of the fortress spur the development of the region, and then the future use of the artifact and the neighboring town is derived from the options for regional development.
The example discussed is that of Golubac, a medieval fortress on the banks of Danube in Eastern Serbia. There is a small and relatively neglected town next to it. Apart from the Golubac fortress, there is a great number of other valuable sites in the immediate vicinity: The Board of Trajan from the Roman period, the Neolithic settlement of Lepenski Vir, etc.
Establishing the model of reintegrating the artifacts into the region is based on theoretical research in planning and related disciplines, as well as on the experience of other cities with similar potential. So formed framework is the basis for testing the options for integrating the Golubac fortress with the Golubac settlement, and neighboring towns of Veliko Gradiste and Donji Milanovac into a functional whole a network of towns that maximizes the complementary potentials of these towns.
The goal of the research is to define possible ways of reintegrating the fortification that could bring a better future to the fort itself, but also to the settlement and the entire region, in such a manner that the offered solutions are flexible enough to bear the radical changes that transition brings along.
The stress is on the question of reintegrating abandoned structures, establishing a network of towns to which Golubac is linked, and on which its development depends, while recycling and problems related to change of ownership (public/private) are touched upon only to the extent that is necessary for the topic of research.

Abstract
The graduate course in Urban Planning, Design and Management involved researching the existing and potential role of abandoned towns in the wider spatial context.
As a participant in this research, I examined the possibilities for their (re)integration into wider spatial and functional wholes. Abandoned towns can be linked one to another at spatial levels of varying scope, but also according to different criteria: cultural, historical, bio-geographical, etc. In other words, there are at least two ways of linking: (1) connecting these artifacts into a complex functional network, and (2) their integration into existing regional wholes.
The latter way is especially interesting because there is a two-way influence: cultural and historical, environmental, tourist, and other potentials of the fortress spur the development of the region, and then the future use of the artifact and the neighboring town is derived from the options for regional development.
The example discussed is that of Golubac, a medieval fortress on the banks of Danube in Eastern Serbia. There is a small and relatively neglected town next to it. Apart from the Golubac fortress, there is a great number of other valuable sites in the immediate vicinity: The Board of Trajan from the Roman period, the Neolithic settlement of Lepenski Vir, etc.
Establishing the model of reintegrating the artifacts into the region is based on theoretical research in planning and related disciplines, as well as on the experience of other cities with similar potential. So formed framework is the basis for testing the options for integrating the Golubac fortress with the Golubac settlement, and neighboring towns of Veliko Gradiste and Donji Milanovac into a functional whole a network of towns that maximizes the complementary potentials of these towns.
The goal of the research is to define possible ways of reintegrating the fortification that could bring a better future to the fort itself, but also to the settlement and the entire region, in such a manner that the offered solutions are flexible enough to bear the radical changes that transition brings along.
The stress is on the question of reintegrating abandoned structures, establishing a network of towns to which Golubac is linked, and on which its development depends, while recycling and problems related to change of ownership (public/private) are touched upon only to the extent that is necessary for the topic of research.

Keywords
reintegration, artifacts, town network, region identity
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